Everything you need to know before going to your first gynaecologist appointment

by LotteLust

So you’re planning to see your doctor for a referral to the gynaecologist. Or maybe you’re already waiting for the day of the appointment. What can you expect and how to prepare? Find the information you need for a smooth experience in this article.

When should you see a gynaecologist?

Your doctor won’t refer you to a gynaecologist for no reason. There needs to be a risk of infection or something wrong with the female reproductive organs to get that referral. Here are some of the symptoms you might experience:

  • different discharge than usual;
  • frequent unwanted urine loss;
  • stomach ache (or cramps);
  • problems with your cycle like excessive blood loss;
  • your reproductive organs (or one of) are infected;
  • Abnormalities and/or pain symptoms
  • uterine prolapse;
  • menopause issues;
  • pregnancy issues;.

First visit to the gynaecologist

Your doctor referred you to a gynaecologist and the appointment has been scheduled. At this point, you  probably want to know what to expect from the consultation! Usually these intake appointments start with a few questions, this way your gynaecologist can determine how severe your complaints are. For instance, you could be asked questions about your:

  • complaints;
  • medical history;
  • general health;
  • menstruation cycle;
  • sexual activity

After this questionnaire, you are told what the next steps will be. You also could – if that’s necessary – agree to an (internal) checkup. Are you uncomfortable with that? Then it’s also possible to plan a follow-up appointment. Or the gynaecologist decides they can’t be of help to you and you get referred back to your doctor.

Tip: Before going to the appointment, write down any information that could be helpful. Like when you last menstruated, whether that is unusual or not and when you’ve last had sex. It’s also a good idea to write down any questions you might have, in case you end up forgetting during the appointment.

Examination methods

A medical examination is possible after that first intake. These are some of the examinations you could get:

An internal examination

For this examination, you need to use a cervical dilator. This way, the vagina opens up far enough to see in. The gynaecologist then uses a speculum , which is a medical instrument that somewhat resembles the beak of a duck. The speculum gets inserted in the vagina. By using this instrument, the gynaecologist can easily see the uterus.

This might feel a little uncomfortable, but it is sometimes necessary to perform the examination. Also, the gynaecologist can -during an internal examination- insert two fingers in the vagina to feel the size of the uterus and tubes. An echo could also be made. If you’re uncomfortable or experience pain, please let your gyno know.

An echo

The making of an echo is -in most cases- harmless and not painful at all. A picture of the body part gets taken by using soundwaves. This image tells the gynaecologist everything they need to know about the structure, shape and placement of the organs. An echo can be internal or external. 

A swab

During this method, the gynaecologist pushes a small brush against your cervix to brush off some cells. This sounds more uncomfortable than it is! The cells get examined by a pathologist. You usually get the results of this test after 2 or 3 weeks.

For more information about medical health check out this article:

5 things that increase your chance of getting an STD

areyoucoming

Leave a Comment

You may also like

We use cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More

Privacy & Cookies Policy